The day I die


Came across something wonderful and just had to share,
Copied from a wonderful site. http://johnpavlovitz.com/. Full credit to the author.

On the die I day a lot will happen.

A lot will change.

The world will be busy.

On the day I die, all the important appointments I made will be left unattended.

The many plans I had yet to complete will remain forever undone.

The calendar that ruled so many of my days will now be irrelevant to me.

All the material things I so chased and guarded and treasured will be left in the hands of others to care for or to discard.

The words of my critics which so burdened me will cease to sting or capture anymore. They will be unable to touch me.

The arguments I believed I’d won here will not serve me or bring me any satisfaction or solace.

All my noisy incoming notifications and texts and calls will go unanswered. Their great urgency will be quieted.

My many nagging regrets will all be resigned to the past, where they should have always been anyway.

Every superficial worry about my body that I ever labored over; about my waistline or hairline or frown lines, will fade away.

My carefully crafted image, the one I worked so hard to shape for others here, will be left to them to complete anyway.

The sterling reputation I once struggled so greatly to maintain will be of little concern for me anymore.

All the small and large anxieties that stole sleep from me each night will be rendered powerless.

The deep and towering mysteries about life and death that so consumed my mind will finally be clarified in a way that they could never be before while I lived.

These things will certainly all be true on the day that I die.

Yet for as much as will happen on that day, one more thing that will happen.

On the day I die, the few people who really know and truly love me will grieve deeply.

They will feel a void.

They will feel cheated.

They will not feel ready.

They will feel as though a part of them has died as well.

And on that day, more than anything in the world they will want more time with me.

I know this from those I love and grieve over.

And so knowing this, while I am still alive I’ll try to remember that my time with them is finite and fleeting and so very precious—and I’ll do my best not to waste a second of it.

I’ll try not to squander a priceless moment worrying about all the other things that will happen on the day I die, because many of those things are either not my concern or beyond my control.

Friends, those other things have an insidious way of keeping you from living even as you live; vying for your attention, competing for your affections.

They rob you of the joy of this unrepeatable, uncontainable, ever-evaporating Now with those who love you and want only to share it with you.

Don’t miss the chance to dance with them while you can.

It’s easy to waste so much daylight in the days before you die.

Don’t let your life be stolen every day by all that you believe matters, because on the day you die, much of it simply won’t.

Yes, you and I will die one day.

But before that day comes: let us live.

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10 Responses to The day I die

  1. M T McGuire says:

    Amen to that. Brilliant, brilliant stuff. Hope you are well Bill, I was just wondering how you are getting on this morning. I realised, also, that I’ve been following your blog for 9 years (as BC and then MTM) which seems pretty amazing in itself.

    All the best and God bless,

    MTM

    Thank you, it is an amazing bit of writing. Wish I could claim credit for more than just copying it.
    We have been together here on the blog for a long, since virtually the beginning. Thank you for hanging in with me and all the support over the years. You are a good friend.
    I do remember your BC, Baby Chaos days. Remember reading some of your early stories.
    Nice to hear from you my friend
    Bill

  2. lypenner says:

    These thoughts certainly do help a person keep things in perspective don’t they. We so rarely practice seeing things from the big picture, so this is a good reminder. Thanks Bill. And, to add to MTM’s observation, I think I’ve been following your blog since the article about you appeared in the Free Press (2007 I believe) so that’s 9 years as well. Holy smokes! 🙂

    Hi Lydia. It is a thought provoking article. I thank you for being such a good blogging friend also. You have actually stepped up and responded to comments when I have been off feeling under the weather, for which I thank you so much.
    Now obviously excluding family of course, I have only had the pleasure of meeting 2 of my blogging friends. You are one of them. Our visits have been a great pleasure.
    Thank you for being such a good and supportive friend
    Bill

    • lypenner says:

      Hi Bill. You’re very welcome for stepping up, I figure we’re all a bit of a community here, though I don’t want to be presumptuous or claim to know what the heck I’m talking about! We’re all in this together.

      And it’s been a pleasure to meet you as well and visit with you and Vi. I appreciate our friendship as well.
      Lydia

  3. Noel says:

    This is a big lesson in life.

    Hi Noel, it sure is. Nice to hear from you
    Bill

  4. hilarymb says:

    Hi Bill – you posted as I went away to live for the weekend … seeing an old school friend and generally catching up with others, visiting some places .. and living – not sitting on the machine!

    Too true to all that the post said … we need to remember we never know what is around the corner of our lives …

    Good to read the post and thanks .. it’s very relevant to us all – cheers to you and Vi – Hilary

    Hi Hilary, so nice to hear from you. Glad to hear you got out and had a great time. Enjoy everyday as we can.
    Bill

  5. rangewriter says:

    A great reminder to us all. Because we all will one day die.

    Thank you my friend, so true the same fate ultimately awaits us all.
    Nice to hear from you.
    Bill

  6. Mel says:

    “They rob you of the joy of this unrepeatable, uncontainable, ever-evaporating NOW”

    All credit to the author—it’s brilliantly written. And very well stated.

    And I’m certainly guilty of letting the noise and hype get my attention at times. But I’m living in circumstances that constantly remind me to enjoy the precious moments with every one that I love and hold dear.
    Yaknow–I sometimes STILL get amazed at how G-d multi-tasks.
    We now have a 5 month old grandbaby….that’s a miracle, given we were making funeral arrangements on day three of his little life. It’s stretched us all and helped every one of us stay in TODAY, live in THIS MOMENT. He remains in critical care, dependent on a respirator, but plays and smiles and wriggles–oh….and had his first haircut just last week. 🙂 Those are all gifts that we celebrate. He reminds me (and all of us ) that life is fragile and fleeting, but that there is PURPOSE.
    He’s delivered that message over and over again…and ya know, it’s the same message this saged person wrote about.
    It’s all about love.
    Simple enough, really. But we let that other ‘stuff’ get in the way. Because we’re human, I’d suppose….. LOL Darn that HUMAN stuff, anyway. 😉

  7. Laura says:

    Bill! I have been worried for you, not writing here for so long, how are you feeling? Happy to hear from you again.

  8. John Butler says:

    Well, as Spinoza once wrote, “the free man meditates upon life, not upon death.” To me, that is the wisest thing anyone ever said, and is especially helpful to those who, like me, have no belief in God or an afterlife. It is fruitless to think about something one simply has to do, like it or not. If we live, we must die, and even if we don’t live very much, we must die. Meditation upon a void is a waste of time which could be spent living.

  9. Lydia P says:

    Happy Easter Bill & Vi!

    Thank you Lydia. Hope you had a wonderful Easter
    Bill

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